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Don't blindly follow requirements


Each rule/requirement has a reason to exist and I firmly believe the written form of the rule is rarely 100% mirroring the intention.

A really nice example of this is the following situation:

Rule/Requirement -> Person on ID photo shouldn't have glasses on


My rejected photo
If you look closely you can see my glasses which is a clear breach of the rule.

PS: To you my fellow clerk in the Swiss Strassenverkehrsamt: I'm not angry at you, but when the AI kicks in, you will the first to be replaced by  computer;)

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