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RTI - training for testers in Bratislava

I wanted to contribute into the testing culture of my company, so i decided to lead a training.

I was trying to condensate the Rapid Testing Intensive online 3 days course from James Bach and Michael Bolton into a 6 hour training class.

It went in my opinion quite well. I don’t want to reproduce the theory part of it, which you can see here

The practical part was more interesting, each of the participants was testing an freeware screenshot tool (which I rather don’t mention here), we were suprised how many bugs we found on an publicly used tool, some of them crashing the whole application down.

Our Mission:


Whole testing took over 2 hours and we had an interesting review session afterwards. The output of which was afterwards this Test Report.

Test Report

Results:

- The product's basic functionalities work. Non-typical scenarios produce unstable and unacceptable results,
 there are also minor bugs that are acceptable
- There are a few specific scenarios resulting to the application crash
- The application is hierarchically unintuitive in several instances
- There are indications that the portable and installed versions differ
- Mutual agreement on our recommendation -> Buy only under the condition that the known bugs are fixed and deeper testing is conducted thereafter

Testing:

- We performed paralelly 4 sanity check sessions by different testers to gain both confidence in the results and remove possible subjective factor
- Each session was 120 minutes long and a group review was following these sessions

Caveats and recommendations:

- Bug fixing followed by retesting is required
- Additional deeper testing is strongly recommended - various platforms, resolutions and monitor devices are recommended to be used
- Redesign and comprehensive manual is needed to be delivered

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