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RST Explored - My experience

My experience report from my recent RST Class

I attended the RST class after a while, wanting to refresh my knowledge about the RST view on testing.
It was a 4-day event, each day 3 Sessions, approx 4hour/day. My general impression was that it enriched and refreshed my understanding of testing.
 
Each of the four days had an central theme
Day 1: "It is possible to test everything?"
Day2: "When to stop testing? How to test from specifications."
Day3: "Product coverage outline. Complexity of the system"
Day4: "Risk analysis and coverage"
 
Going deeper into the topics of each day would be impossible without spoilers, I will therefore rather focus on my impressions and what this training has brought me.
The way Michael was guiding us through the class was very engaging, although we usually started with a short lecture, questions and remarks were encouraged from start and we had an shared review after each exercise - students explaining their work, but more importantly their way of thinking.
Exercises itself had the right amount of challenge in them, each time there was a short intro and we were split into groups.
The group discussion after each exercise was a very strong learning experience, we were partially guided to go as close to the solution ourselves through questioning (Socrates method) and after some time Michael presented his take on the solution.
My main takeaway from the training was improvement of my analytical skills, opening eyes to new approaches to tackle the usual testing challenges like "what to test", "how to best cover it", "what are the risks".
I would recommend this class as a solid introduction into the testing profession and a great way to deepen your testing knowledge if you are already a veteran tester.

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